Ussuri Brown Bear

Ussuri brown bears, found on the Japanese northern Island of Hokkaido, weigh up to 550kg and can live up to 35 years.

Just 10,000 left in Japan

Ussuri brown bears‘ omnivore diet consists of plants, seeds, nuts, fruits, invertebrates, eggs, fish and small or larger mammals. The mammals are on the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species due to their vulnerability to habitat loss, illegal hunting and capture, and being poached for body parts and skins.

The bears are extinct across parts of Asia and there are thought to be 10,000 left in Japan. In July 2018, Yorkshire Wildlife Park was at the centre of a project to re-home four mature brown bears from Japan.

With the Yorkshire Wildlife Park Foundation supporting animal welfare projects in Asia including Japan, alongside Yorkshire Wildlife Park they have been working with other organisations to secure the bears’ move, including agencies in Japan and with UK charity Wild Welfare, a global organisation committed to improving welfare standards in captive wild animal facilities.

NOW OPEN!  The bears are the first residents in a new Rehabilitation Centre at Yorkshire Wildlife Park.

Rescue Bear

News update

The Ussuri Brown Bears have now safely arrived at Yorkshire Wildlife Park!  Read the full article about their incredible move and watch their amazing journey unfold in this short film: www.yorkshirewildlifepark.com/brownbearsarrive 

Video courtesy of BBC Breakfast

Can you help?

In order to help kit out the brown bears’ reserve, Yorkshire Wildlife Park are still asking companies or tradespeople to donate the following enrichment and platform materials. Please email info@yorkshirewildlifepark.com to get in touch.

  • 20 metres of metal chain link.
  • 20-30 Nr D screw links
  • Plastic barrels
  • Bark chipping
  • Sand
  • Pea shingle
  • Trees and shrubs
  • Berry seeds
  • Wildflower seeds
  • Large logs
  • Boulders/ large stone
  • Shelter huts
  • Thick ropes
  • Bungee cords >150mm diameter
  • Varying sizes of boomer balls
  • Brush heads
  • Hollow bamboo of varying widths
  • Hessian sacks
  • Recycled plainings
  • Water butt