Lemur Woods

IMPORTANT NOTICE – Lemur Woods is currently closed due to renovation work, thank you for your patience. Wander through the Madagascan world of the lemurs in a walkthrough experience that will have you gasping with joy as lemurs leap from the tree tops. Meet our endangered Ring-tailed lemurs and our critically endangered Black-and-white ruffed lemurs and learn more about the cheeky characters at the Ranger Talk. Lemur Woods is an acre in size with over 20 trees – so the area the lemurs have can be looked at as a 3 dimensional cubic space – they use all the space!


Ring-tailed Lemurs – Lemur catta

Endemic to Madagascar, Ring-tailed lemurs are easy to spot due to their long, striped black and white tails. Thought to have floated to Madagascar on rafts of vegetation millions of years ago, lemur’s like many of Madagascan species have evolved very differently to other animals around the world due to Madagascar’s isolation. A fun fact for all the ladies out there, it is actually the females that are dominant in lemurs.

Ring-Tailed Lemurs

Ring-tailed lemurs use their distinctive tails to to communicate with each other, they will also use them in “stink battles” by rubbing scents on their tails and flicking them at other lemurs. Ring-tailed lemurs spend a lot of their time on the ground (as you might notice when you are at the park) foraging for fruit, leaves, flowers, sap and tree bark to eat.

Fact File

Conservation Status – Endangered

Endangered

Location – Madagascar

Lemur Map

Threats

Habitat loss

Ring-Tailed Lemurs
Ring-Tailed Lemurs

Black-and-white ruffed lemurs – Varecia variegata

One of the largest species of lemur in Madagascar and the largest at YWP, Black-and-white ruffed lemurs are critically endangered in the wild. They communicate with each other using sounds and scents. If you are lucky enough, you will hear their calls ringing out across YWP, they are thought to be the second loudest primate in the world (after howler monkeys).

Black-and-white ruffed lemurs

They also use their big bright yellow eyes to convey messages to other lemurs. Black-and-white ruffed lemurs will have keep their young in a nest and are though to be the only primates in the world to do this.

Fact File

Conservation Status – Critically Endangered

Critically Endangered

Location – Madagascar

Lemur Map

Threats

Habitat loss

Black-and-white ruffed lemurs
Black-and-white ruffed lemurs

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